cutting on the action

photography and film – facts, ideas, values

FILM CRITIC THEORIST André Bazin





FILM THEORIST Andre Bazin




Introduction to André Bazin, Part 1: Film Style Theory in its Historical Context


Introduction to André Bazin, Part 2: Style as a Philosophical Idea


By Donato Totaro, Offscreen, Vol 7, Issue 7/July 2003


I can see in a previous post a link to part 1. Since these two popped up recently, thought is good idea to have the links in one place.


Also:


Back to Bazin Part 1: The Ontology of the Photographic Image

2008 post in Spectacular Attractions.


If you fall into the who the hell is Bazin category, or I’ve heard the name am a bit vague on his ideas, it might well be worth a quick zip through Dan North’s first para before tackling the Totaros. Or even sticking to it all the way through. He has included useful links including the Totaro. It all goes round and round.


Cruelty and Love in Los Olvidados
by André Bazin

In: The Cinema Of Cruelty, Arcade Publishing, New York, 2013.


Posted by Eduardo Carli de Moraes in his blog, Awestruck Wanderer. His latest post highlights Jo Sacco’s graphic novel, Palestine. Lots of interesting posts and check the side panel.



July 22, 2014 Posted by | André Bazin, Donato Totaro, film theory | , | Leave a comment

FILM ESSAY NICO BAUMBACH – All that Heaven allows: what is, or was, cinephilia



All that Heaven allows: what is, or was, cinephilia [part 1]


All that Heaven allows: what is, or was, cinephilia [part 2]


Film comment, Film Society Lincoln Center, 12 February 2012


At time of this post two further parts were promised


Part 1 quotable quote:

Bordwell’s argument is framed as an attempt by an academic to reach out to film critics not simply to heal a rift but to mutually enrich both practices. Yet more interesting, and problematic, he outlines what writing about film can successfully accomplish and what it cannot. He implies that the opposition between academics and critics obscures a more fundamental opposition between two different ideas of what the primary object of writing on cinema should be — its relation to culture and society or to the more localized specifiable effects that films produce. He believes that by ignoring the latter in favor of the former, film criticism and theory have lost sight of their object.



Part 1 mentions Laura Mulvey’s 1975 essay, Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema


There is a digital cross-through in this version, so I’ve included a couple of other sources: LM 2 and a facsimile of the original article/paper: LM3 (which in a footnote says it’s a reworked version of a paper given in the French Department of University of Winsconsin, Madison, in the Spring of 1973


Baumbach quotes Mulvey:

“It is said that analyzing pleasure, or beauty, destroys it. That is the intention of this article.”



which he then goes on to explain, including:

..her statement came from a conviction that theory about cinema mattered not just in relation to gaining specialized knowledge about a particular popular art form, but to how we live and experience the world.




March 16, 2012 Posted by | Andrew Sarris, auterism, Cahiers du cinéma, Christian Metz, cinephilia, David Bordwell, film analysis, film theory, film theory/film criticism, film [its techniques], George Toles, J. Hoberman, Laura Mulvey, Metz, Rudolph Arnheim, Siegfried Kracauer | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

FILM LINK Slow Cinema and the Long Take



To add to my collection of posts on the long take, one from Either/Or/Bored, titled, Slow Cinema and The Long Take.

Nagging feeling it is already mentioned in a previous post. What the heck.

Links in there to:  Top 15 Amazing Long Takes (and onwards to other film lists), Pasolini’s essay,  Observations on the long take, which must already be linked to somewhere else in COTA. Who cares, a blog is a searchable database, Mark le Fanu’s, Metaphysics of the “long take”: some post-Bazanian reflections, and to a film mag 16:9 essay by Mathew Flanagan, Towards an Aesthetic of Slow in Contemporary Cinema.  Also, the first pic I have seen of Bazin. Didn’t imagine him like that at all.

August 15, 2010 Posted by | Bazin, film techniques, film theory, film [its techniques], long take | , , | Leave a comment

FILM TRUFFAUT His Myspace page



tuffaut-fag-on

You’d expect a man like that with the vision and energy for film to find a way to tap into the social networks beyond the grave!

Here Truffault’s Myspace page, which is full of interesting stuff  produced by Carletto di San Giovanni, whose own myspace is pretty fulsome too.


April 20, 2009 Posted by | film analysis, film directors, film editing, film narrative, film theory, film [its techniques], francois truffaut, Truffaut | , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM ESSAY Camera Movement revisited {by Jakob Isak Nielsen}



Camera Movement Revisited


by


Jakob Isak Nielsen




in Danish film mag 16:9



April 11, 2009 Posted by | film analysis, film directors, film editing, film theory, film [its techniques] | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM Showing what can’t be filmed {post by David Borwell}



From Film Studies For Free:

Observations on film and Film Art: showing what can’t be filmed.

David Borwell, 4 March 2009, on David Borwell’s website on cinema.



March 22, 2009 Posted by | André Bazin, Bazin, cinéma-vérité, film analysis, Film and psychoanalysis, film directors, film editing, film narrative, film theory, film [its techniques] | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

FILM Hitchcock and Psychoanalysis


Hitchcock & Psychoanalysis



March 8, 2009 Posted by | Hitchcock | , , | Leave a comment

Film: A Case for Cognitivism by David Bordwell



This essay, A Case for Cognitivism, from 1989 is introduced with a shorter, later piece, Cognitive Film Theory.

If we want to know how films work upon us, then cognitive theory offers a range of concepts which correlate nicely with notions like norm, form, function, and psychological experience.




January 13, 2009 Posted by | David Bordwell, film theory, film [its techniques] | , , | Leave a comment

FILM BOOK: Image and Mind – Film, Philosophy and Cognitive Science



Image and Mind: Film, Philosophy and Cognitive Science
By Gregory Currie

Apparently a book about:

… the nature of film: about the nature of moving images, about the viewer’s relation to film, and about the kinds of narrative that film is capable of presenting. It represents a very decisive break with the semiotic and psychoanalytic theories of film that have dominated discussion over the past twenty years. Professor Currie provides a general theory of pictorial narration and its interpretation in both pictorial and linguistic media, and concludes with an analysis of some ways in which film narrative and literary narrative differ.

Reviewer Robert Hopkins does not seem overly happy with it.



January 10, 2009 Posted by | film analysis, film directors, film editing, film theory, film [its techniques] | , | Leave a comment

Film: Béla Balázs


Film art has a greater influence on the minds of the general public than any other art.

Béla Balázs



Theory of the Film (Character and Growth of a new Art)

Complete e-text . Facsimile.

Learnt about the existence of this book from Film Studies for Free. The links there would keep even the most ardent film person busy for ages.

English translation by Edith Bone. !952.


Wiki:Béla Balázs


Revealing the Soul: Balázs and the Close-Up [9.29.03]
By Britta Blodgett


Grand Hotel

Screenplay by Béla Balázs



December 28, 2008 Posted by | Béla Balázs, cinematography, film analysis, film directors, film theory, film [its techniques] | , , | Leave a comment